Cold War Veteran Grass Valley Dream Flight

A World War II veteran living in the Sierra foothills who also served in the early days of the Cold War suffered the theft of his life. Willie Mills, 95, grew up in an era when boys who finished high school didn’t talk about their looks. Instead, they talked about the military branch they wanted to get into to be a part of WWII. He enlisted in the US Army Air Corps at the age of 17 in 1945 and trained as an aircraft mechanic. At the end of the war, he served in the Philippines as a crew chief, maintaining the Air Force’s first jet fighters. Stationed at a base amid groves of bananas and coconut palms and a shallow lagoon of warm Pacific waters, Mills was later fired and had ambitions for college. But he eventually made it to Hayward Airport to work on small planes. Mills then rebuilt C-54s that would be used in the Berlin Airlift for Transocean Air Lines, making him a unique veteran, having served his country both at the end of World War II and at the beginning of the war. Dream Flights, upon learning of Mills’ service in the United States, gave him the opportunity to board a vintage plane: a Boeing Stearman biplane. The organization pays tribute to veterans and the elderly by offering them these flights. “It was very nice to fly over the Grass Valley area and the house where I live now,” said Mills. “It was a really good flight. I wish it had been a bit longer, and I appreciate what the folks at Dream Flights have done for the military. Wills flew on September 29 from the Grass Valley Airport. He had moved to the area shortly after the death of his wife, Patsy Mills, in 2013. They were married for 64 years. Wills’ ride on the biplane came after a creamy night out ice cream he had with his neighbor, Debbie Lindh. Lindh said she would meet Wills every Wednesday on her porch. It was there that she learned about her unique status, having served in the military in two eras. Mills son and granddaughter, they thought it would be a good idea for Mills to be honored in the same way. So they called on his behalf. Lindh said. “And he loved that he did. could fly over hi is at home and will see the region in which he lives. And I think he felt honored that we recognized him for who he is and for his service to the country.

A WWII veteran living in the Sierra foothills who also served in the early days of the Cold War has been given the theft of his life.

Willie Mills, 95, grew up in an era when boys who finished high school didn’t talk about the college they attended. Instead, they talked about the military branch they wanted to get into to be a part of WWII. He enlisted in the US Army Air Corps at the age of 17 in 1945 and trained as an aircraft mechanic.

At the end of the war, he served in the Philippines as a crew chief, maintaining the Air Force’s first jet fighters. Parked at a base amid groves of bananas and coconut palms and a shallow lagoon of warm Pacific waters, Mills was later fired and had ambitions for college. But he eventually made it to Hayward Airport to work on small planes.

Mills then rebuilt C-54s that would be used in the Berlin Airlift for Transocean Air Lines, making him a unique veteran, having served his country at the end of World War II and the start of the Cold War.

Dream flights, upon learning of Mills’ service in the United States, gave him the opportunity to board a vintage aircraft: a Boeing Stearman biplane. The organization honors military veterans and the elderly by offering them these flights.

“It was very nice to fly over the Grass Valley area and the house where I live now,” said Mills. “It was a really good flight. I wish it had been a bit longer, and I appreciate what the folks at Dream Flights have done for the military.

Willie Mills, a World War ll veteran who also served in the Cold War, goes to Grass Valley

Wills flew on September 29 from Grass Valley Airport. He had moved to the area shortly after the death of his wife, Patsy Mills, in 2013. They had been married for 64 years.

Wills’ ride in the biplane came after an ice cream party he had with his neighbor, Debbie Lindh. Lindh said she would meet Wills every Wednesday on her porch. It was there that she learned about her unique status, having served in the military at two different times.

Lindh said she saw a Facebook post about someone planning a dream flight for her father, and after chatting with Mills’ son and granddaughter, they thought it would be a good idea. that Mills be honored in the same way. So they called on his behalf.

“Willie felt really proud, in a humble way, that he was able to do this,” Lindh said. “And he loved that he got to fly over his house and see the area he lives in. And I think he felt honored that we recognized him for who he is and for his service to the country. “


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