A Cold War nuclear bunker on sale for £18,000 with no water, gas or electricity but with room for a toilet

The perfect place to wait out WW3: Cold War nuclear bunker could be yours for just £18,000 with no water, gas or electricity but with room for a chemical toilet

  • The structure offers ‘open country views’ over Pontefract, West Yorkshire and ‘frontage and road access’
  • Although built to withstand nuclear attack, the bunker is currently dangerous and is described as “very primitive”.
  • The underground accommodation is 20 feet below ground and equipped with space for a chemical toilet and chairs
  • Without water, gas or electricity, the £18,000 bunker lacks all the comforts of 21st century life
  • The structure is one of the few Cold War bunkers in the UK, most of which closed in 1991.

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A Cold War bunker is up for grabs for £18,000 – but it has no water, gas or electricity.

The nuclear observation station was once occupied by the Royal Observation Corps.

It is said to have “open countryside views” and “road frontage and access”.

The ‘inner dwelling’, which sits 20 feet underground, is described as ‘very primitive’.

For security reasons, potential buyers will not be able to enter the Pontefract bunker in West Yorkshire to take a look.

A Cold War-era nuclear bunker in Pontefract, West Yorkshire, is up for sale for £18,000 – with the listing offering ‘open countryside views’

The bunker, which was once occupied by the Royal Observation Corps, is described in the advert as

The bunker, which was once occupied by the Royal Observation Corps, is described in the advert as “very primitive”, lacking electricity, gas and running water.

The listing, put together by The County Property Auction, reads: ‘The internal accommodation includes a locked entrance hatch that leads to a 20ft vertical ladder leading to an underground chamber.

“This room would have housed the observers, their instruments and the welfare facilities.

“There is also a smaller room which would have housed a chemical toilet.

“The conditions were very primitive; there was no running water, gas or electricity.

The property can only be visited on foot and during the day.

For security reasons, potential buyers will not be able to enter the bunker to take a look.

The only access to the outside world for Royal Observation Corps volunteers would have been through a loudspeaker intercom, connected to the headquarters of the UK’s Warning and Surveillance Organisation.

There were once over 1,500 bunkers across the UK, but almost all were closed down in 1991

There were once over 1,500 bunkers across the UK, but almost all were closed down in 1991

Although the bunker does not have running water, it is equipped with space for a chemical toilet

Although the bunker does not have running water, it is equipped with space for a chemical toilet

Located 20 feet underground, the structure was designed to protect the occupants from nuclear attack

Located 20 feet underground, the structure was designed to protect the occupants from nuclear attack

Also known as the UKWMO, it was a civilian organization providing British military and civilian authorities with data on nuclear explosions and fallout predictions across the country in the event of nuclear war.

Ryan Gibson, a marketing consultant from Wakefield, called it “an attractive residential development opportunity”.

Max Bramwell, a real estate investor, added: “It would make an awesome Airbnb.”

No telephones were provided, but the post had a warning receiver to know when to sound the manual siren, and each zone’s main post had a radio for a back-up to the landline intercom .

According to bunker experts Subterranea Britannica, there were over 1,500 bunkers across the UK.

Almost all were permanently closed in 1991.

The bunker and the land surrounding it are due to be auctioned on June 21.

It has a guide price of £18,000.

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